“have been irksome and almost intolerable. To examine the causes of life, we must first have recourse to death. I became acquainted with the science of anatomy, but this was not suf-cient; I must also observe the natural decay and corruption of the human body. In my education my father had taken the greatest precautions that my mind should be impressed with no supernatural horrors. I do not ever remember to have trembled at a tale of superstition or to have feared the apparition of a spirit. Darkness had no effect upon my fancy, and a churchyard was to me merely the receptacle of bodies deprived of life, which, from being the seat of beauty and strength, had become food for the worm. Now I was led to examine the cause and progress of this decay and forced to spend days and nights in vaults and charnel-houses. My at- tention was xed upon every object the most insupportable to the delicacy of the human feelings. I saw how the ne form of man was degraded and wasted; I beheld the corrup- tion of death succeed to the blooming cheek of life; I saw how the worm inherited the wonders of the eye and brain.”

This passage above puts off the tone of how Frankenstein feels about supernatural, imaginary, superstitious and fantasy types of things. It shows that





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